Brigitte Anne-Marie Bardot, French actress, animal rights activist, fashion model and singer was born on 28th September 1934.

She started her acting career in 1952 and after appearing in 16 films became world-famous due to her role in the controversial film And God Created Woman. During her career in show business Bardot starred in 48 films, performed in numerous musical shows, and recorded 80 songs.

Young, seductive and carefree – Brigitte Bardot dressed with a perfect blend of French chic, class and sex appeal.

Brigitte Bardot was a sensation during her heyday in the 1950s and 60s. Her beauty and chic made her a huge style icon in France and internationally. Every famous model has done a Brigitte Bardot fashion shoot and celebrities still copy her style to this day.

Since Kate Moss began channelling her look five years ago, Bardot’s fashion influence has been bubbling away below the surface with women all over the world now sporting a Bardot influenced look.

Find out the key elements of her sex appeal here and get ideas of how to incorporate some of Brigitte Bardot’s magic into your own appearance.

Brigitte Bardot’s Figure

Bardot’s body formed a huge part of her sex appeal and the main reason why clothes just looked so good on her. Beautifully proportioned, she kept her figure until well into her sixties. She always dressed to play up her tiny 22 inch waist – either by wearing dresses that were cinched and fitted at the waist, or by putting on a wide belt.

Women with a size six, eight or ten figure are going to find it easier to achieve her look.

Bardot had years of ballet training in her youth. Everyone who met her in the flesh commented on her regal posture and beautiful way of moving. Anyone who wants to emulate Brigitte’s look should make an effort to move well. At the very least stand tall, pull the shoulders down and back to elongate the neck, and develop a graceful yet wanton walk!

The Clothes Bardot Favored

Bardot’s style was very chic and feminine. She never went in for luxurious clothes, preferring simple, classic pieces instead. The good news is that this makes achieving her look more affordable. Her years as a ballet dancer heavily influenced her style. The dancer’s wardrobe of black tights, leotards, hair bands, tight fitted clothes were constantly popping up in her outfits.

Shoe-wise, Brigitte Bardot is most strongly associated with the ballet flat. In 1956 she asked the famous shoe maker Repetto to design her a shoe that was as delicate and easy to wear as a dance slipper but suitable for everyday wear. She brought the ballet flat from the studio out onto the street.

She occasionally wore a small kitten heel but never wore a very high shoe. She often confessed a preference for going barefoot.

Bardot popularized the bikini, liked feminine little sun dresses and neat capri pants. She showed off her legs at any opportunity and wore minimal jewelry.

When marrying her second husband, Bardot went totally unconventional and wore a pink gingham knee length dress and singlehandedly put gingham back on the map.

Some key Bardot pieces include: a black hairband worn over messy hair, a black bow in the hair, skinny jeans, cute cardigans, striped t-shirts, simple day dresses, a cream trench coat.

Hair and Make up

Bardot’s hair was naturally mousey blonde but she began bleaching it early on in her film career. She wore it in a carefree, bed-head style. Her hairdresser invented a relaxed up-do which allowed her to pin her hair up loosely without looking too “done” or prim. The key to her hairstyle is to get some loose waves into the hair – with rollers or curling tongs, backcomb it at the crown (a lot! Bardot was known for big hair) and wear it in a messy, not too perfect style. Grow it long!

Bardot played up her eyes with black eyeliner. Line the eyes heavily, both top and bottom of the lids and “wing” the liner at the outer corner. She kept her foundation very natural, little or no blusher, preferring a light golden tan instead. Keep the lips natural as well.

Source: womensfashion.suite101

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